International Higher Education and Global Science

China and Europe on the New Silk Road. Connecting Universities Across Eurasia. Edited by Marijk van der Wende, William C. Kirby, Nian Cai Liu, and Simon Marginson. Oxford University Press (2020).

Conference Information

4 – 5 November 2021

Utrecht, The Netherlands

Title: International Higher Education and Global Science – EU-China relations in a Changing World Order

4–5 November 2021
Paushuize
Utrecht, The Netherlands

On 4–5 November, a conference on “International Higher Education and Global Science – EU-China relations in a Changing World Order” will take place in Utrecht, the Netherlands. The conference will look at how international higher education, global collaboration, open science, and Sino-European-US connections are evolving in the changing world order.

The conference will build on the international research project on the New Silk Road’s implications for higher education and research cooperation and focus both on the research and the policy agendas.

On 4 November, researchers will exchange and update their insights from inquiry and explore the agenda for further research. On 5 November, a wide range of actors and stakeholders will be engaged in panels discussing the emerging policy agenda for higher education and research collaboration and its implications for universities and their leadership.

The conference will be conducted at Paushuize in a hybrid format, allowing a combination of on-site and online contributions, interaction, and attendance.

Participation online is guaranteed upon registration, but on-site is limited in number (max 50 on day 1 and max 100 on day 2) due to the Covid situation. There are no fees for participation or catering. Unfortunately, we have already reached the maximum capacity for day 1, but there are still seats available for day 2!

The event will be hosted by Utrecht University in collaboration with the University of Göttingen and with kind support from the Volkswagen Foundation.

Venue address:
Paushuize
Kromme Nieuwegracht 49
3512 HN Utrecht, The Netherlands

You can register now here.

Upon registration, you will receive a 30% discount on China and Europe on the New Silk Road – Marijk van der Wende, William C. Kirby, Nian Cai Liu, Simon Marginson – Oxford University Press (oup.com)

China and Europe on the New Silk Road

Connecting Universities Across Eurasia

 

Edited by Marijk van der Wende, William C. Kirby, Nian Cai Liu, and Simon Marginson

The new book China and Europe on the New Silk Road Connecting Universities Across Eurasia (Oxford University Press) was successfully launched On 5 November in a well-addended Zoom webinar.

The book addresses the opportunities, controversies and tensions surrounding the New Silk Road. It looks at how universities, while faced with challenges to their autonomy and values, stand firm to defend global cooperation.

Description
The global order, based on international governance and multilateral trade mechanisms in the aftermath of the Second World War, is changing rapidly and creating waves of uncertainty. This is especially true in higher education, a field increasingly built on international cooperation and the free movement of students, academics, knowledge, and ideas. Meanwhile, China has announced its plans for a “New Silk Road” (NSR) and is developing its higher education and research systems at speed. In this book an international and interdisciplinary group of scholars from Europe, China, the USA, Russia, and Australia investigate how academic mobility and cooperation is taking shape along the New Silk Road and what difference it will make, if any, in the global higher education landscape.

Opening chapters present the global context for the NSR, the development of Chinese universities along international models, and the history and outcomes of EU-China cooperation. The flows and patterns in academic cooperation along the NSR as they shape and have been shaped by China’s universities are then explored in more detail. The conditions for Sino-foreign cooperation are discussed next, with an analysis of regulatory frameworks for cooperation, recognition, data, and privacy. Comparative work follows on the cultural traditions and academic values, similarities, and differences between Sinic and Anglo-American political and educational cultures, and their implications for the governance and mission of higher education, the role of critical scholarship, and the state and standing of the humanities in China. The book concludes with a focus on the “Idea of a University”; the values underpinning its mission, shape, and purpose, reflecting on the implications of China’s rapid higher education development for the geo-politics of higher education itself.

Press Release

This is not a time to be silent.
This book addresses the opportunities, controversies and tensions surrounding the New Silk Road. It looks at how universities, while faced with challenges to their autonomy and values, stand firm to defend global cooperation.

The global order, based on international governance and multilateral trade mechanisms, built in the aftermath of World War II, is changing rapidly. Notably Brexit and the retreat of the USA from multilateralism have created waves of uncertainty, not the least in the field of higher education, regarding international cooperation, the free movement of students, academics, scientific knowledge and ideas.

Meanwhile, China is launching new global initiatives with its “New Silk Road”, is developing its higher education and research systems at speed, and is actively seeking to cooperate with academic partners along the New Silk Road.

It is unclear how these new relationships will affect European higher education and research; how this cooperation will contribute to addressing the global challenges we are all being faced with, and to the global common good. How this emerging reality can conform with current Western views and growing criticism of China concerning the key values of an open society, the belief in fundamental human rights, dignity, and the rule of law. And how the growing tensions between US and Chinese trade and security agendas and neo-nationalist trends influence collaboration. How can universities tackle these and stand firm to defend internationalization, autonomy, and academic freedom?

Clearly, this is not a time to be silent. Therefore the ambition of this book is to be open to the various perspectives and controversies surrounding the NSR, to build understanding for both sides, and to strengthen hope for continued global collaboration. It aims to critically explore the possible implications of the NSR for higher education and research cooperation between China and Europe, by looking at the main challenges and opportunities, including a consideration of the risks and uncertainties in the context of growing sensitivities in relationships between China and the West.

To this end, it presents a rich collection of contributions from an international and interdisciplinary group of scholars from Europe, Asia (notably China), the USA, Russia, and Australia, who were engaged in a two-year dialogue under the research project on “The New Silk Road: Implications for higher education and research cooperation between China and Europe”. It combines perspectives from anthropology, computer sciences, economics, education, history, law, political science, philosophy, science and technology studies, sinology, and sociology.

Central questions regard how academic mobility and cooperation are taking shape along the New Silk Road, under which conditions, defined by whom, and based on which values? And what, if any, difference will the New Silk Road make in the global higher education landscape?

The global Covid pandemic makes these findings only more relevant; how will it impact the main trends and issues in collaboration between China and the West? Which trends in academic cooperation with China will be sustained, enhanced, rebalanced, delayed, or even reversed? How will the EU position itself? And what is most at stake in the changing geopolitical order: international collaboration, competition, trust, open science, globalization as such?

The emerging new global context provides abundant food for thought and a wealth of questions for further research. The editors remain convinced that such research should be undertaken in close collaboration between China and the West.

About the editors:
Marijk van der Wende, Distinguished Faculty Professor of Higher Education, Utrecht University
William C. Kirby, T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies, Harvard University
Nian Cai Liu, Director of the Center for World-Class Universities, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Simon Marginson, Professor of Higher Education, University of Oxford

More information:
Table of Contents | Author Information | For press and media inquiries, please Contact Us | Request a Copy for Review Here | View this Press Release as PDF.

The project is carried out by an international consortium coordinated by Utrecht University’s Centre for Global Challenges (UGlobe).

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